What Do You Do In Case of a Data Centre Power Failure?

A turned-on emergency light

The companies of today, private and public sector entities alike, rely heavily on the functions of a data centre. It streamlines IT operations and houses critical information about the organisation. Making sure that it runs without interruption is crucial.

When a power outage occurs, temperatures can rise rapidly and affect your data centre. Masterflow Solutions explains that unfired pressure vessels, such as buffer tanks, can help mitigate further damage during a power outage.

But what else can you do to handle a power outage?

Invest in Better Airflow Solutions

The average temperature range in a data centre is between 64.4-80°F, so keeping your data centre’s temperature within those values is advisable. But because power outage affects your cooling system, you’ll have no clear way of staying within that range.

You can opt to plug in your cooling system to backup power, but doing so means less power for the data centre. In this situation, investing in good airflow management solutions can help you manage the situation. It doesn’t rely on electric cooling systems to lower temperatures but still keeps it stable.

With a well-executed airflow management plan, you can rely less on the cooling system, leaving you with more backup power to expend on the data centre itself.

Use Buffer Tanks

Buffer tanks are extremely useful equipment in ensuring that your data centre is cool during a power outage. For one, integrating a buffer tank eliminates the need for another cooling system or chiller.

But the most important role of buffer tanks during a power outage is providing chilled water storage. Uninterrupted Power Sources (UPS) backup energy storage generally takes time to recharge, so the chilled water storage can help provide much needed cooling while the UPS recharges.

Always have Backup Generators

Of course, you can’t afford to let the data centre out of commission for long. You can rely on chilled water storage and airflow management while waiting for UPS power to return, but a longer wait means less satisfied clients or partners.

Having a backup generator handy can significantly improve the situation. Not only does it help the data centre run back up, it turns on the cooling systems as well.

Your organisation depends on how you churn out important data and information, so keeping your data centres functional even in a power outage is crucial. Invest in sustainable solutions and always have a plan.